Art, Immagine & Poesia, Installazioni, Lidia Chiarelli

Lidia Chiarelli’s installation- Agliè (Torino Italy) – September 2018

Agliè (Torino Italy) – Lidia Chiarelli, installation artist and poet, in the GARDEN FOR PEACE – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYDV0QmPS4k

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Adel Gorgy, Art, Fine Art Photo, Mary Gregory

“Delicacy and harmony” critical essay by Mary Gregory, fine art photos by Adel Gorgy

Credit: Chelsea News, NY

Photos

  • Sakai Hoitsu’s red maple fills one side of a pair of folding screens. It’s one of the masterpieces included in “The Poetry of Nature.” Photo: Adel Gorgy

  • “Hollyhocks and Prince’s-Feather Flowers” a haiku-like scroll painting on silk by Sakai Oho (1808–1841). Photo: Adel Gorgy

  • Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, one of the masters of Meiji woodblock prints, depicts a magical realm in “Fudo Myoo Threatening a Novice.” Photo: Adel Gorgy

  • Nagasawa Rosetsu’s “Cranes” from the Edo period (1615–1868) are among the delights on view in the Met’s Arts of Japan galleries. Photo: Adel Gorgy

  • Alternate views of “Cranes” by Nagasawa Rosetsu. Photo: Adel Gorgy

  • Detail, “Outer Robe (Uchikake) with Phoenixes and Paulownia.” Photo: Adel Gorgy

  • “Mynah Birds,” by an unknown artist from the Momoyama (1573–1615) or Edo (1615–1868) period in Japan. Photo: Adel Gorgy

  • Cherry blossoms by Sakai Hoitsu deliver promises of rebirth through dazzling imagery. Photo: Adel Gorgy

 

 

BY MARY GREGORY

The word museum comes from the ancient Greeks. Mouseion was a house of the muses. Sometimes, the museum itself becomes the muse.

Temper a hot summer day in a cool, shaded gallery at The Met Fifth Avenue filled with delightful reflections of nature. In a time of record heat, blazing wildfires and torrential storms, it’s a subject we all need think more about.

The Arts of Japan galleries are filled with poetry, art, moonrises, birds in flight, grazing deer and exquisite calligraphy. “The Poetry of Nature: Edo Paintings from the Fishbein-Bender Collection” presents a distant time and place, but through a local connection. The exhibition features some 40 paintings from the collection of New Yorkers, Dr. Estelle P. Bender and her late husband, T. Richard Fishbein. Most have never been publicly displayed before, and most are promised gifts to the museum. They’re joined by earlier works from The Met’s collections as well as contemporary ceramics and photography, to give a sense of tori-awase, or connoisseurial arrangement, a traditional Japanese practice to heighten awareness and let objects communicate not just with the viewer, but with one another as well.

The exhibition fills several galleries with works that span from the 10th to the 21st centuries, though the focus is on the Edo period. From 1615 to 1868 Japanese artists came in contact with China and the West, finding new ways of seeing and creating. The Fishbein-Bender collection features those who broke from tradition. There’s a rare scroll by a 17th century female artist, Kiyohara Yukinobu. Her painting of waxwings, a small sparrow-like bird, may hold a secret message. The affectionate birds symbolized marital harmony; Yukinobu and her husband were both artists.

Harmony is a key theme of the exhibition. Poetry and painting are married, too, in many of the works. Verses tumble down the sides of scrolls; gorgeous lines of ink convey gorgeous lines of poetry. A delicately painted glazed tile, where calligraphy and the currents in a river mimic each other’s movements, contains a message from a 10th century poet: “Taking a tally of ripples on the face of the water, glimmering in the moonlight, we know that this night, tonight, the peak of autumn has arrived.” The texts of all poems incorporated into artworks are translated, making for a rich experience.

“Hollyhocks and Prince’s-Feather Flowers” a small scroll painted by Sakai Ōho (1808–1841), looks like a tidy corner of someone’s backyard garden. In reality, it’s a masterpiece of positive/negative space, minimalist line and pure color. With the left side empty, balanced by only a few dark green leaves, a smattering of red spots, white blossoms and a tiny orange butterfly, it’s a yin-yang of nostalgia and transcendence. Nature and artistic nurture join to create a poetic perfection.

A pair of towering folding six-panel screens presents flowering cherry and red-leafed maple trees. Their gnarled trunks have seen many years, yet their blossoms and leaves speak of rebirth. It’s an expression of wisdom and innocence, a moment and eternity, joined symbolically by Sakai Hōitsu, the artist.

Myriad myna birds, fat frogs, gangly grasshoppers, swirling snails, plumed phoenix and plump monks are among the charming creatures depicted in paintings, sculptures, woodblock prints, embroidered robes, ceramics and basketry. Perhaps the most delightful is a pair of scrolls depicting three cranes. Posed against a soft, featureless background, they stand, two on one scroll, the other alone. Nagasawa Rosetsu painted them in the 1780s. It’s as though the artist wanted to paint every crane, capture every nuance, show the very essence of them. In one panel, two birds are depicted, one facing sideways, tall and elegant, the other with its back to the viewer. On the second panel, the bird gazes at the viewer head-on. The round body tapers to a comical nub of a head, all skinny neck and bulging eyes. It’s impossible not to smile, not to fall in love with her.

And that’s the point of the show — to get us to cherish the beauty in nature. Be inspired by a muse. Consider works by artists who understood that their survival depended on harmony with nature. Because, despite air conditioning, pavement and the wonders of plumbing and mass transit, ours does, too.

Art, Gloria Keh, Gogyoshi, Immagine & Poesia, Lidia Chiarelli

“BREATHE ME” gogyoshi and painting by Gloria Keh, Singapore

BREATHE ME

Breathe me into your body.

Breathe me into your soul.

Breathe me

like you’ve never breathed before.

Breathe me now.

RESPIRAMI

Respirami nel tuo corpo.
Respirami nella tua anima.
Respirami
come non hai mai respirato prima.
Respirami  adesso

Traduzione di Lidia Chiarelli

BREATHE ME

Art, Immagine & Poesia, Lidia Chiarelli, Tzemin Ition Tsai

The sunset even feels cold, poem by Tzemin Ition Tsai 蔡澤民 – Taiwan. Digital Collage by Lidia Chiarelli, Italy

夕陽寒

 

潮水

恣意侵擾我的沙灘

夕陽的規勸

引著泛紅的眼眶

沒一日讓過

在過去的一千萬年

 

不領情的西風

總是偷偷地來又偷偷地走

轉動

巨型風力發電塔風扇

對於人類與大自然的對抗

不言一語

 

收拾

垂掛四周的紗網

心裡不明白

如何應付小魚兒的反問

那細目可網得住秋風

那細目可捕獲得了下海前的

 

 

The sunset even feels cold

 

That tide infested waywardly my sandy beach

Sunset’s advice

With red eyes

No day to let off

In the past ten million years

 

Those ungrateful westerlies

Always secretly come and also secretly go

To turn

The giant fan of that wind power tower

For the confrontation between man and nature

Do not say a word

 

Clean up

Those gauzes hanging in the surrounding

My heart does not understand

How to deal with the questions of the little fishes

Are those thin meshes

able to catch the autumn wind?

Are those thin meshes

able to catch the cold before jumping into the sea?

Poem by

蔡澤民
 

 

Freddo Tramonto

 

La marea infestava ostinata la mia spiaggia di sabbia

la suggestione del tramonto

gli occhi rossi

nessun giorno da tralasciare

negli ultimi dieci milioni di anni

 

Quegli  ingrati venti occidentali

sempre segretamente vengono e segretamente vanno

per far girare

il ventilatore gigante della torre elettrica di vento

per un confronto tra uomo e natura

nessuna parola

 

Ripuliscono

quelle reti appese tutto intorno

il mio cuore non capisce

come affrontare le domande dei piccoli pesci

sono quelle maglie sottili

in grado di catturare il vento autunnale?

sono quelle maglie sottili

in grado di catturare il freddo prima di cadere in mare?

Translation by Lidia  Chiarelli

 

 

 

Art, Immagine & Poesia, Poetry

“WHERE I CAME FROM” poem and image by Timileyin Gabriel Olajuwon, Nigeria

WHERE I CAME FROM

This is a song on the lips of gods…

Since gods are spirits,
where do gods live? – you may ask;
gods live in the desert of milk
of honey set in between dry bamboos,
they house in a cave of public streets
of living dead – wrenched of the earth,
they hide in the rusty land of gold
of flowing streams set on swollen faces,
they live in the mind of riches and
the thought of life’s tussle.

gods live in the body
In the memories of our being;
of war, pains, smile and joy,
they live in the red wine of our broken bones
and in the seasoned smile of broken promises
(Epistle of lies);
gods live in the pit of unknown pity
on the vast field of greenish grains.

this song reminds me of
the tears of my mother,
the pains of my father,
the plights of my brothers,
and the “dryness” of my sisters…
it reminds me of silence
in the memory of where I came from!

@ Timileyin Gabriel Olajuwon 2017

unnamed